Gran Torino

Gran Torino

DVD - 2009
Average Rating:
44
7
6
 …
Rate this:
Walt Kowalski is a widower who holds onto his prejudices despite the changes in his Michigan neighborhood and the world around him. Walt is a grumpy, tough-minded, unhappy old man, who can't get along with either his kids or his neighbors. He is a Korean War veteran whose prize possession is a 1972 Gran Torino he keeps in mint condition. When his neighbor, Thao, a young Hmong teenager, becomes pressured by his gang member cousin to steal Walt's Gran Torino, Kowalski sets out to reform the youth. Drawn against his will into the life of Thao's family, Walt is soon taking steps to protect them from the gangs that infest their neighborhood.

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

v
VonHafenstaaad
Aug 08, 2017

This is just a wonderful wonderful movie. From top to bottom the acting is amazing. Clint Eastwood at his best!

t
TheSandoz
Jun 27, 2017

The comedy-drama on release is actually a rather wise, insightful exploration of family and friendship, violence and vengeance.

AL_TATYANA Sep 15, 2016

Terrific movie! if you are an Eastwood fan, you must see it!
It does take guts to face the gang.

e
EMP_0
Jan 02, 2015

This was a very good movie; what racism and prejudice do to a person eating away at their core. You have to wonder why a person is like that, and Clint Eastwood's experience lets you know exactly what he went through.
The kindness and persistence of those who were Chinese brought out his humanity.
When it came to his family, they were despicable and were only there to see what they could get from their father/grandfather; It's a stark reality of families today.

t
Tonyacl
Jun 24, 2014

Walt Kowalski: Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone.

i
Isley
Jun 12, 2014

Yet another by the numbers Clint Eastwood drama that pushes all the usual buttons and shamelessly takes its gravitas from a central manufactured tragedy. He does this stuff well, but it’s not enjoyable for me to watch and I’ll be avoiding his future movies despite his amusing (yet scenery chewing) performance.

j
jaredjza
May 29, 2014

Set in modern day Detroit, Gran Torino is a film that follows elderly Korean War veteran Walk Kowalski (Clint Eastwood). Walt’s wife has just recently passed away, and he is distanced from the rest of his family, and feels that they only care about inheriting his assets. A bigot, he feels alienated from the “new” American world of multiculturalism, and is especially cold towards his new neighbours, Asian Hmong immigrants. Walt is very racist towards them, and refuses to help when a Hmong teen, Thao, approaches him and asks to borrow jumper cables. He refuses to accept that the world around him has changed. Thao, meanwhile, is struggling in the gang-ridden suburbs of Detroit. He is lacking a father figure in his life, and submits when his cousin’s gang forces him to steal Walt’s precious car, a Ford Gran Torino. Walt catches Thao in the act and later saves his Hmong family from the gang. This leads to an unlikely friendship between Walt and Thao’s family. But when the Hmong gang, in revenge, attack Thao’s house in a drive by shooting, and kidnap his sister, Walt must take drastic action to ensure the safety of his friend’s family.
Gran Torino is a great film about making unlikely friendships in modern America. It displays how bridges can be built between very different generations and cultures. Walt represents the “racist grandfather” who grew up in “a different time”, and this film shows how he might now be such a bad guy after all.

r
rslade
Jul 19, 2013

Possibly a bit self-indulgent to begin, but powerful in the end.

SpencerSpencer Feb 13, 2013

Good good movie. Suspenseful, socially aware, and humorous at times. This was a good story, gripping, while not being mushy or schmaltzy or over-the-top violent. Good story line too, about a nasty,bigoted, angry Korean War veteran with unexpected morality, decency, and humanity.

s
Saint_Mirin
Jan 09, 2013

Reminded me too much of Focus with William H. Macy. Perhaps more humor in this film but I liked Focus better for exploring this type of subject matter.

View All Comments

Quotes

Add a Quote

e
EowynThandawen
Sep 21, 2012

Walt(looking at his son's Toyota); Would it kill you to buy American?

m
Marcell_Murray
May 25, 2012

"You let yum-yums walk right out on ya'. You know she likes you?
Ehh...whatever eggroll...."

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Youa: You're funny.
Walt Kowalski: I've been called a lot of things, but never funny.

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Walt Kowalski: Oh, I've got one. A Mexican, a Jew, and a colored guy go into a bar. The bartender looks up and says, "Get the f**k out of here."

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Duke: What you lookin' at old man?
Walt Kowalski: Ever notice how you come across somebody once in a while you shouldn't have f**ked with? That's me.

Sunnchilde Apr 16, 2011

"What was it like to kill a man?"
"You don't want to know."

m
Mahala
Jul 27, 2010

Be a man Toad!

Notices

Add Notices

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Violence: This title contains Violence.

t
Teyfor8Wyoma
Aug 02, 2010

Coarse Language: Extremely course language, which becomes comical at parts.

t
Teyfor8Wyoma
Aug 02, 2010

Violence: Beatings, gang fights/assaults

m
Mahala
Jul 27, 2010

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

lilmisslibrary Aug 30, 2009

Coarse Language: Coarse language - especially a lot of racial / ethnic slurs.

Age

Add Age Suitability

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

bdls206 thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

t
Teyfor8Wyoma
Aug 02, 2010

Teyfor8Wyoma thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

m
Mahala
Jul 27, 2010

Mahala thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Summary

Add a Summary

b
bdls206
Aug 08, 2011

Disgruntled Korean War vet Walt Kowalski sets out to reform his neighbor, a young Hmong teenager, who tried to steal Kowalski's prized possession: his 1972 Gran Torino.

m
Mahala
Jul 27, 2010

Clint Eastwood is retired Ford factory worker Walt Kowalski. As a veteran of the Korean War, Kowalski has seen and done a lot of things he wishes he hadn't. He's bitter, antisocial, and politically incorrect. After his wife's funeral, we discover that he doesn't get along too well with his sons, specifically Mitch and his wife, His grandchildren don't appreciate him one bit; the granddaughter only wants his stuff, hand-me-downs to take with her to school. They don't make things easy for him, but then again, he doesn't make things easy for them, either. It's a vicious cycle of resentment and miscommunication.

As this is being established, we're introduced to a teenage boy named Thao (Bee Vang), who lives next door to Kowalski with his large Hmong family. He's the black sheep of his deeply traditional family, always doing chores that the women are supposed to do. Having no direction in life, he's pressured by his cousin, nicknamed Spider to join his neighborhood gang. As an act of initiation, Thao must sneak into Kowalski's garage and steal his most prized possession: A 1972 Gran Torino. The attempt backfires as Walt chasing him down with his shot gun. Some time later, Spider arrives with his posse and tries to abduct Thao for messing up. The resulting scuffle is broken up when Kowalski points his shotgun at the gang members and demand they get off his lawn.

Within no time at all, Kowalski's front steps are covered with tokens of appreciation from Thao's family, none of which are appreciated. But then Kowalski gets to know Thao's sister, Sue a remarkably independent young woman. Quick-witted and outgoing, she takes Kowalski's racial slurs in stride, believing that a good man lies behind the disgruntled façade. As he spends more time with Sue and her family, he begins to realize that he has more in common with them that with his own family, which, in all likelihood, scares him more than it brings him comfort.

When Thao formally apologizes for trying to steal Kowalski's Gran Torino, Kowalski puts him to work doing various chores, like repainting a house and fixing gutters. Hardly a scene goes by when he isn't verbally berating Thao, although it's obvious from the start that he's doing it to toughen him up, to make him believe that his life has a purpose and that he should actively be trying to find it. Part of this involves getting Thao to talk like a man. There's a priceless scene in which Kowalski brings Thao to a barber, who has been sharing insults with Kowalski for a number of years. Afterwards, Kowalski arranges for Thao to work at a construction site; the boss, as it turns out, is the perfect man for Thao to test his new vocabulary on. What Kowalski doesn't realize is that he's learning just as much from Thao, especially in matters of caring for other people. Eventually, Kowalski comes to the conclusion that Thao and his family will never be at peace so long as Spider and his gang are around and he decides to take matters into his own hands.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at PDL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top