In this scathing documentary Amy Berg gathers a host of articulate voices from experts on Church history and canonical law to psychologists, lawyers, and a few brave families willing to recount what happened to them over thirty years ago. The result in a damning critique on a Catholic hierarchy more concerned with saving face and money than protecting children from predatory priests. So murky was the official response to the allegations against O’Grady—indeed to all cries of molestation everywhere—that one lawmaker likened the Church to the Italian Mafia in its evasiveness and penchant to hide behind lawyers while making underhanded deals with the perpetrators. In one instance evidence suggests that former bishop Roger Mahoney, O’Grady’s immediate superior, took part in a massive cover-up in order to protect his own ecclesiastical aspirations; a shameful move which paid off when he was promoted to cardinal. Taped depositions of church officials trying to squirm their way out of probing questions are infuriating enough until Berg interviews O’Grady himself and a deep chill sets in for it quickly becomes evident that behind the grandfatherly chuckles he is a sexual sociopath incapable of appreciating the emotional devastation he left in his wake. With a trail of culpability leading all the way to Vatican City Berg’s exposé is a study in rage and frustration, but when she turns her camera on a guilt-ridden father and his struggling adult daughter it’s enough to rip your heart out. In a postscript Berg mentions that to date the Roman Catholic church has paid out one billion dollars in settlements and legal fees to victims of abuse, and one gets the sinking feeling that that is a mere drop in the bucket. Essential viewing.

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